Kansas City Native Plant Initiative Welcomes Director Stacia Stelk

Stacia Stelk1The Kansas City Native Plant Initiative (KCNPI) is pleased to announce the selection of Stacia Stelk as its first Director effective November 1.  The selection was made after a national search and rigorous selection process.

“We are thrilled to have Stacia joining KCNPI,” said KCNPI Core Group President Kathy Gates.  “She brings a unique set of experiences and skills ideally suited to this position.  We look forward to her entrepreneurial leadership as we pursue creative partnerships to expand native landscapes in Kansas City.”

Stacia joins KCNPI with more than 20 years of experience in leading non-profit, business and community organizations.  She previously served as Director of Programs and Development at Bridging The Gap, and led the Greenability Challenge for Greenability magazine.  As a strategic planning consultant, her clients included Johnson County, Kansas, the Missouri Recycling Association, and the Touched by Cancer Foundation.

Most recently, Stacia was the Director of Ripple Glass, responsible for launching and building a business that included the implementation of a robust and effective glass collection program throughout Greater Kansas City.  Graduating with honors in 2000, Stacia completed her Master’s Degree in Non-Profit Management from the University of Missouri – Kansas City.   She has a Bachelor’s of Science in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from the University of Kansas.

The Kansas City Native Plant Initiative is the culmination of my personal passions and professional experience,” said Stacia. “I am excited for the opportunity to lend my skills to this exciting organization.  I love that KCPNI is tangible, local and can have a significant impact.”

Kansas City Native Plant Initiative (KCNPI) is a 501(c)(3), whose 50+ multi-sector partners share a vision of beautiful, native landscapes connecting heartland communities where nature and people thrive together. Their mission is to increase community knowledge of the importance of preserving and expanding native landscapes for generations to come.

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